Principal

National Science Week is Australia’s annual celebration of science and technology. Running each year in August, it features more than 1000 events around Australia, including those delivered by universities, schools, research institutions, libraries, museums and science centres. Over one million people participate in science events across the nation.

In 2020, National Science Week must be held in a different way, with travel restrictions and physical distancing requirements now in place to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. Our teachers planned several exciting events “at home” during the past week.

Bishop Tyrrell was one of 250 schools taking part in the Exploding Watermelon Competition billed as one big experiment. Each school conducted trials for the experiment to gather as much data as possible. There were predictions, plans, dependent and independent variables, measurements, even a little maths. It is a great example of collaborative science, something that happens the world over (usually for more scientifically important reasons). It was a great success with Mr Chiswell and his scientists taking an average of 151 elastic bands to “blow up” a melon.

Space exploration is supercharged at the moment following recent Space X successes and students had the opportunity to be involved in building and designing rockets. They quickly learned that both atmospheric conditions and construction difficulties play a large role in a successful launch. To further their understanding of the dangers of rocket fuel, Mr McCarthy demonstrated the production of hydrogen and its explosive nature when sodium metal is mixed with plain old water.

Students also entered the Young Scientist Plane Challenge with Ms Pearse which stretched their technological imagination as they explored material and physical world concepts. They also got involved in a bottle recycling program to reinforce increasing plastic pollution in our water ways.

For the more chilled students and staying on water themes, students have enjoyed the screening of Finding Nemo over several lunch time breaks.  In class, students have tried a virtual escape room challenge where they needed to draw on their scientific knowledge from a range of different disciplines under the theme of the Big Blue.

With all the challenges facing our world the need for scientists to play a big role in finding solutions to complex issues, celebrating Science every day is vital.  Happy Science week everyone!

Sue Bain
Principal

Preschool featured image

Preschool

Recently the Preschool teachers have been planning learning environments with appropriate levels of challenge to encourage children to explore, experiment and take appropriate risks in …

view ARTICLE

Preschool

Recently the Preschool teachers have been planning learning environments with appropriate levels of challenge to encourage children to explore, experiment and take appropriate risks in light of Science week.  This supported the children in developing a range of skills and processes such as problem solving, inquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, researching and investigating.

The children were very excited and eager to participate, using their 5 senses in these fun learning experiences. During the experiences, the children hypothesised their thoughts and theories on what and why they thought things would happen.

Sink and float – exploring how and why different items float and sink
What will sink and what will float?
“It is floating” said Luca
“Pom Pom float” said Amelia
“Rock sink” said Parker

Bouncy egg – investigating chemical reactions
What will happen to the egg in the vinegar?
“It will break in the vinegar” said Beaudie
What does the egg feel like?
“Cold” said Kyrah
“Bumpy” said Zac
“Soft and weird” said Mason

Milk and food dye experiment – exploring movement and bonds
What will happen?
“I think it will be a rainbow swirl” said Patsy
“It will turn in to a potion” said Daisy

Running rainbow experiment – investigating capillary action, cohesion, gravity and colour mixing
How do you make a rainbow?
Wet and the sun” said Cameron
“Rain and water” said Eddie

Making snow using cornflour and bicarb soda – exploring textures and habitats
How can we make snow?
“We need water” said Atlas
How does it feel?
“Soft” said Zac
“It’s not cold” said Adrian
“Soft and crunchy” said Sophia

Volcano lava lamp – examining reactions and cause and effect
What can you see?
“A lot of bubbles” said Halle
“Big and little bubbles” said Austin
“There was lava” said Archer

Through the children engaging in these hands-on experiments, it helps them to grow big ideas and understand fundamental concepts such as observing, comparing, classifying, measuring, communicating, inferring and predicting.

This learning experience can be linked to Piaget’s theories. He believes the child is an active learner and that the child must be given opportunities to explore, discover and experiment. These principles underpin all cognitive development.

April Cooke
Preschool Director

Primary featured image

Primary

Busy busy busy is the only way to describe this term with all the classes involved in a variety of different activities for science week …

view ARTICLE

Primary

Busy busy busy is the only way to describe this term with all the classes involved in a variety of different activities for science week and in preparation for book week. Our STEM program is in full swing with Mr Youman doing an amazing job across all the years. In particular, our Year 6 students got a real BUZZ with their work on electrical circuits. Students were able to light up the room, not only with their personalities, but with their lighting boards. Although we focus on science every week it is fantastic we have a special science week which provides an opportunity for our budding scientists to explore their special interests.

The Book Week parade took place today and we hope you enjoyed the Live Stream. The Costumes were amazing and most importantly the students had a great time sharing their book adventures. We plan to share the live stream of our assemblies in a similar way so parents can still be a part of this important weekly event. They take place every Monday morning and the Year 6 students do an amazing job organising and presenting the content.

This term we have started a new award called the Captain Durie Award. The award recognises students who have shown exceptional leadership during the week. Teachers put forward nominations and we choose two from each Stage who stand out from the others. They receive a certificate and they get to choose a reward from Captain Durie’s treasure chest. It’s a bit of fun while at the same time encouraging the students to be leaders in everything they do.

Over the last couple of weeks, we have noticed a few students arriving at school before 8 am. Its important students arrive after 8 am as there is no teacher supervision before then. If families require an early drop off the College provides an amazing OOSH service which opens at 6:30 am each school day. Please make contact with our friendly OOSH staff if you require more information.

Now it’s time to find out what has been happening throughout the year groups.

Kindergarten has continued to enjoy reading traditional fairy tales and completing tasks that solve problems or ignite their imaginations. They enjoyed creating their own Troll from the Three Billy Goats Gruff and then writing descriptive sentences about them. When a letter arrived from the Troll asking how they could make more friends, the students demonstrated their ‘You Can Do It’ strategies by explaining very confidently what the smelly Troll must do. Kindergarten explored 2D shapes and manipulated materials confidently to demonstrate simple strategies of multiplication and division. We have also started to investigate different types of materials that we use to make things around us.

Over the past couple of weeks, Year 1 have spent a lot of time focusing on their Global Citizens Project. They have created posters to put up around the College, written letters to parents to ask for their support and some even spoke at the Primary Assembly. It has been wonderful to guide their ideas and support them as best as we can. Please continue to bring in your donations of toiletries and non-perishable food and place in the tubs outside the Art Room each morning.

Year 2 have moved onto finding the main idea in short passages during their English lessons. They have learnt that there are four handy hints to assist them when searching for the main idea of a text. They have also begun to write the introduction to their own version of ‘The Magic Dictionary’ by Bruce Whatley. We are looking forward to seeing what whacky and wonderful adventures their characters go on. In Mathematics, students have conducted chance experiments to find the likelihood of different phenomenons occurring and used chance terminology to compare the likelihood of two events. They then moved onto area, where they used informal units to measure the area of different spaces in the classroom. In Geography, students have been studying the picture book ‘Are We There Yet?’ by Alison Lester, looking at all the different Australian landmarks the family visit on their trip around Australia. They have identified which state or territory each of these places are located and plotted their position on a map. The students also shared some photos of the places they have visited around Australia with their families. In Science, students are beginning to investigate water at home and the community. They are assessing how and where water is used in the home and how some people use water in their jobs and throughout the community. In the last fortnight, we have begun to create our ideas during Deep Learning time. There has been lots of cutting, sewing, gluing and stuffing. Students have also had to use their citizenship, creativity and collaborative skills to complete the tasks in the ‘creating’ phase of the project.

Year 3 took the opportunity of Science week to go on a melting binge. Some people like to eat chocolate and marshmallows but we prefer to melt them and to see what happens from a scientific point of view. Students have also been working hard on their fractions using a range of strategies to explore this area. As you would expect most preferred ½ a chocolate rather than a ¼. Although the Olympics have not happened this year, Students were still able to produce a recount in English from the position of an Olympian.  Their writing skills are amazing, almost as good as their book week costumes.

In STEM this week, Year 4 found an application for their coding knowledge as they entered the world of robotics. Mr Youman led the class as they applied their designing skills to modify a robotic Sphero. Students designed their own vehicles for a Lego character and test drove them for 2 metres, all before entering “The Hall of Dreams or Nightmares” racetrack. Students had to navigate obstacles and each other as they applied their digital skills to practical challenges. Next time, students will begin writing their own robot code and they can’t wait!

Year 5 have had an engaging week. In Science, we have been learning all about camouflage as a behavioural adaptation that some animals use to help them survive in their environment. In Geography we have been continuing to learn about Rainforests. The students have really enjoyed learning about the different types of animals that can be found in a rainforest and have learnt how those animals rely on the natural rainforest environment to survive. For writing, Year 5 have been learning how to write Informational texts and have enjoyed researching information and statistics to include in their Information texts.

This term in Science Year 6 has been learning about energy and electricity. We started the term by investigating energy transformations and building marble roller coasters. The goal was to use gravitational potential energy and kinetic energy to get a marble to go around a loop. We then started to look at how electricity is generated and how to build a circuit. Students were given a series of challenges that involved building different circuits using batteries, wires, lightbulbs and motors. We have also investigated which materials are conductors and insulators and how voltage affects the brightness of lightbulbs.

Mark Durie
Head of Junior School

Secondary – Academics featured image

Secondary – Academics

Year 12 Students – Entry Information and Applications All Year 12 students are aware that UAC is open for university applications and they will have …

view ARTICLE

Secondary – Academics

Year 12 Students – Entry Information and Applications
All Year 12 students are aware that UAC is open for university applications and they will have received their UAC PIN. This must be kept in a safe place as the College does not receive a copy of this. Early bird applications close Wednesday 30 September 2020 – see https://www.uac.edu.au/assets/documents/ug-fact-sheets/ug-fact-sheet-key-dates.pdf for more information.

Also, some students may be interested in applying for an Educational Access Scheme, a Schools Recommendation Scheme or an Equity Scholarship. These are also open, visit https://www.uac.edu.au/future-applicants/scholarships-and-schemes/educational-access-schemes/disadvantages-and-documents for more information on scholarships and schemes. Students can see Mrs Demmocks or me for more information regarding these schemes.

Year 11 students: The HSC Year 2021 – The Final Lap
All current Year 11 students and parents were invited to a virtual information evening a couple of weeks ago.  The intention of the evening was to provide students and parents with information relating to extension subjects and subjects with major work components for the final year of schooling. If you missed this session, the recording and presentations are in CALEB: https://caleb.btac.nsw.edu.au/homepage/2414. Any students intending on picking up Year 12 extension subjects need to see me for a change of subject request form.

National Science Week celebrations
Other articles this week talk about the celebrations held at the College during National Science week, but this is also a great time to highlight the career possibilities for all students in these areas. Here is a great article which highlights how thinking about an everyday moment differently can change a young person’s life: https://www.smh.com.au/national/mum-told-me-to-give-back-to-the-community-the-young-australian-creating-robots-for-good-20200626-p556nl.html

Tania Lloyd
Deputy Principal

Secondary – Pastoral featured image

Secondary – Pastoral

Student Leadership Over the next week, Year 11 students will be submitting their applications for interest in becoming a 2021 Student Leader. All teams of …

view ARTICLE

Secondary – Pastoral

Student Leadership
Over the next week, Year 11 students will be submitting their applications for interest in becoming a 2021 Student Leader. All teams of people, including our community, are at their best when led well. Leaders can have an enormous impact in the life of an organisation and student leaders are especially important in the development and success of a school, as they play a crucial role for the younger students in learning how to behave.

In our student leaders, we are looking for pro-activity, calm, fairness, a sense of service and an ability to take responsibility. We are looking for people who can relate well to others, who are warm and are committed to helping other people succeed and be at their best.

This year the selection process has changed slightly to ensure all students understand that being a student leader carries great responsibility as well as having great rewards. Year 11 have participated in Leadership training as part of their Term 3 Care and Wellbeing program (the INSPIRE Student Leadership Development Program). Using parts of this program, students will submit a written application, 2-minute video outlining their leadership aspirations, have written candidacy support from a teacher, supported by their parents and participate in an interview with senior members of staff. There will also be voting by the staff and students which will give an indication of support for students, although students realise this is not an election, so all other relevant factors will also be considered.

Good luck to those students who are applying. As a College, we respect and applaud all students who put their hand up to give service back to their school.

Tania Lloyd
Deputy Principal

Sport featured image

Sport

Tutor Group Challenge The Tutor Group Challenge run by Fletcher House this term has been a sports-based theme. Each Year group has been rotating between …

view ARTICLE

Sport

Tutor Group Challenge
The Tutor Group Challenge run by Fletcher House this term has been a sports-based theme. Each Year group has been rotating between 4 activities over the course of this term. Round 3 occurred this week and the competitiveness between Houses has really been ramping up! The activities played are dodgeball, table tennis, vortex tennis and table tennis. At the moment Fletcher House is out in front on points with both the Year 9 and 10 Fletcher Tutor groups dominating their age group. With one round to go in Week 8……who will win?

The ongoing COVID situation has once again impacted our school representative sporting pathways. This week, HRIS confirmed that all planned HRIS sporting events for Term 4 have been cancelled. This includes the Under 15’s Tennis, Golf, Softball and the Touch Football Gala days. While this is disappointing, our students have continued to be active and to enjoy their sport while at school. The basketball courts have never been so busy at lunchtime and the cool, sunny days have provided delightful playing conditions.

Year 8 student, Ryan Bonham is an accomplished Race Walker and is now NSW Champion in both the Short Course and Long Course events. Ryan won the 5km under 16’s Long Course event on July 25, walking 5000 metres in a time of 25 minutes and 53 seconds. On August 15, Ryan again won gold, this time in the U15 NSW Short Walk Championships. He walked 3km in 14 minutes 42 seconds – indeed faster than most of us could run the same distance. Ryan hopes for a shot at Nationals this year, which will depend on how the COVID situation progresses. He would have won Nationals last year but was disqualified while in the lead (a common occurrence in Race Walking).



Joel Cruickshank

Head of PDHPE

Creative Arts and Performance featured image

Creative Arts and Performance

Year 7 Visual Arts students have engaged in a collaborative installation where they explored ideas about architecture, culture, urbanisation and imagination. Their installation is a …

view ARTICLE

Creative Arts and Performance

Year 7 Visual Arts students have engaged in a collaborative installation where they explored ideas about architecture, culture, urbanisation and imagination. Their installation is a homage to Filipino artists Alfredo and Isabel Aquilizan’s installation series which investigates the simple medium of cardboard to make large scale sculptures which provoke thoughtful conversations about migration. This project developed students’ skills in making three-dimensional objects that when combined make a collective statement about how students interpret their world. The artwork is an impressive achievement from a diverse group of students with a range of abilities. This installation is not about making the perfect artwork, rather it is a representation of students’ thinking.

Instrumental Teacher Profile
Liz Firth is a music teacher with over twenty-five years of experience tutoring students in clarinet and saxophone. Liz has a proven track record in inspiring and developing young musicians from the early stages of musical development and has taught in numerous prestigious private schools and colleges in Adelaide and Sydney as well as throughout Newcastle and the Hunter Valley.

A graduate from the Newcastle Conservatorium (DSCM) and Elder Conservatorium, Adelaide University (BMus Hons), Liz was accepted for Masters study in performance at the Royal College of Music in London and for a number of years served as a casual clarinet player with the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra.

Always passionate about music education, Liz enjoys working with her students as they meet the challenges of learning a musical instrument and likes to develop an attitude of “can do” in her students as they discover their musical potential. Many of Liz’s students have gone on to become musically aware and accomplished young musicians.

Having worked in many areas of the Australian music industry including, teaching, performing, promotions, retail buying, wholesale, marketing and manufacturing, Liz now dedicates her time to tutoring young clarinet and saxophone students at her private studio. Liz is also a partner in andyfirthmusic.com, where she helps to develop and market Andy’s large range of educationally oriented sheet music for clarinet, saxophone and flute students.

Liz is thrilled to be a part of the Bishop Tyrrell Anglican College Music community and is excited to be working with our Year 3 and 4 students in the Primary Instrumental Performance Program.
Liz Firth

At Bishop Tyrrell we offer Instrumental lessons with some of the most qualified and experienced Instrumental teachers in the Hunter region. Lessons are currently available online before, during and after College hours throughout the week – according to the availability of the individual tutors. Please click on the Instrumental Music Lessons tab on the College Caleb Co-Curricular page and you will be directed to the available instrumental teaching staff and gain access to their College contact details.

Gareth Ross
Head of Creative Arts and Performance

Children, Youth and Families Worker featured image

Children, Youth and Families Worker

From Tolerance to Acceptance  “Which of these three do you think was a neighbour to the man who fell into the hands of robbers?” 37 The …

view ARTICLE

Children, Youth and Families Worker

From Tolerance to Acceptance

 “Which of these three do you think was a neighbour to the man who fell into the hands of robbers?” 37 The expert in the law replied, “The one who had mercy on him.” Jesus told him, “Go and do likewise.” – Luke 10:35-37

It has been wonderful this week to continue to get to know staff and students, and even to introduce myself to some parents at the kiss and ride in the mornings and afternoons. It is hard to believe I am already in my sixth week at the school!

This week we have considered the idea of tolerance and acceptance as part of a framework for living meaningfully in a challenging world. Tolerance is closely linked to the golden rule (do unto others) in that if we want to be treated well, we also need to do likewise to others. Acceptance though is a little more challenging. If tolerance is the ability to ‘put up’ with a person or issue, then acceptance moves us towards being ‘ok’ with that person or issue. This might seem a small distinction but the movement from one to the other is a powerful and liberating process which offers us the freedom to respond to people in love and compassion rather than simply living with the reality of those who are different from us.

In the well-known parable of the Good Samaritan, Jesus is questioned about the definition of the word ‘neighbour’. Well, may we say ‘love thy neighbour’, but the devil is, inevitably, in the detail. Jesus responds, as he often does, by telling a story. A reminder to us that there are no easy answers to difficult questions. The story he tells involves two seemingly holy men who ignore a neighbour in need and a third man who offers aid. This man is a Samaritan, an ethnic group maligned and ostracized by the Jewish majority. Jesus asks who the true neighbour was to the injured man, and his questioner is forced to concede that it was indeed the Samaritan.

This story is more than a morality tale reminding us to do good. It is a scandalous reversal of social order. It is a reminder that our prejudices towards others offer us nothing but a distorted view of life, holding us back from being the people we are meant to be – people of love. We shouldn’t merely tolerate our neighbours – those around us with whom we differ – but rather open ourselves to the possibility that such people are for us Jesus in our midst. Capable of compassion, love and service just as we are. If we are able to move from mere tolerance to acceptance and understanding, we open ourselves to the reality of God’s love – a breaking through of our prejudices and biases to see all people for what they really are – children of the God who names us and calls us home.

Mark Thornton
Children, Youth and Families Worker

News and Notices featured image

News and Notices

2021 Enrolments We love seeing our Bishop Tyrrell community grow each year and we are currently enrolling students for 2021. This is a reminder to …

view ARTICLE

News and Notices

2021 Enrolments
We love seeing our Bishop Tyrrell community grow each year and we are currently enrolling students for 2021.

This is a reminder to ensure any 2021 sibling enrolments have been submitted via the Preschool or K-12 online enrolment form on the College website. If you have any queries do not hesitate to contact our College Registrar Mrs Barb Durie. Please share our website details if you have friends or family who might be considering Bishop Tyrrell. Thank you, our families are our best advocates!

Invitation to Year 6 Parents
The College invites you to a Year 7 2021 information evening to learn more about the secondary program offered at Bishop Tyrrell. The aim of this presentation is to provide you, as current parents, further information as your child begins their transition to Year 7.

We have exciting plans for this Year 7 cohort, with the recently launched Maths Pathways Program, a continuation of Deep Learning and the possible introduction of the 1-1 laptop program.

Tania Lloyd (Deputy Principal) will provide a general overview of the academic and care and wellbeing programs in our secondary school, as well as provide you with the opportunity to ask questions.

Details:
Thursday 10 September, 5.30 pm held via zoom.
Please register your interest in attending here.

Further information will be sent in regards to the Secondary School transition days planned for Term 4.

If your child is leaving Bishop Tyrrell at the end of this year, please ensure we have this notification in writing by the end of this term. This will ensure appropriate notice is given and equally allows us to offer this place to an incoming family.

Lyn O’Neill
Marketing and Development Manager